From There to Here Oil on canvas  From There to Here Oil on canvas  From There to Here Oil on canvas  From There to Here Oil on canvas  From There to Here Oil on canvas  From There to Here Oil on canvas  From There to Here Oil on canvas  From There to Here Oil on panel  From There to Here  Oil on panel  From There to Here Oil on canvas
 From There to Here  From There to Here Graphite  From There to Here Graphite and acrylic on paper   From There to Here Graphite and acrylic on paper   From There to Here Graphite and acrylic on paper   From There to Here Graphite and acrylic on paper

From There to Here: or How to Let a Peculiar Still Point and Brightness in the Woods Ease Our Grief (While Seeking Higher Ground in the Sky)”, From There to Here or How to Let a Peculiar Still Point and Brightness in the Woods Ease Our Grief (While Seeking Higher Ground in the Sky). 
Platform Gallery
May 6, 2016 - June 3, 2016

This show was a retrospective documenting ten years of exhibitions at Platform Gallery. Press Release: "Platform Gallery is pleased to present a selection of paintings and drawings by Patte Loper from exhibitions she mounted at the Gallery over ten years. The work comes from the following shows: Let Our Beauty Ease Your Grief (2006); A Peculiar Brightness in the Sky (2008); Still Point in a Returning World (2011); How to Stay Alive in the Woods (2013); as well as work featured in group shows and art fairs." Exhibition catalogue with essay by Rock Hushka, Chief Curator and Curator of Contemporary Northwest Art Tacoma Art Museum Pictured work: It is Difficult to Teach Bones 2013 Oil on canvas 36" x 48"


Catalog Essay by Rock Huschka, Chief Curator and Curator of Contemporary Northwest Art, Tacoma Art Museum:

“Reconstructing the Ideals of Modernism”
Patte Loper illuminates the fissures and failures of the modern agenda. Yet, she does not destroy our ongoing faith in the hopes and ambitions instilled by the decades of veneration for the modernist pioneers. She gently reminds us that human emotions, failures, and ambitions must continue to strive beyond the purity and stripped-down aesthetic of “pure functionality.”
 
Hoping that some talismanic charm remains, she salvages beauty from the skeletal structures of refined Meisian ideal. These architectural geometries and motifs, which we now cherish as charming relics of a history that fulfilled its promises to only an adventurous few, embraced a radical form of simplicity that denied its meaningful and sustainable relationship to nature. Loper seeks possibility in spaces formed from this fracture and reinserts chaos and chance—and ultimately hope—into the remains of the modern dream.
 
Her favored motif, decaying architectural forms set within a vast natural space, begs reconsideration of why the tenants of the modernist age simultaneously ushered our culture forward and failed so spectacularly. She strips away veneration for modernism’s purity and posits rebuilding on the debris of our failures. Rejecting any fear of a universal collapse, Loper offers reassuring guideposts to grapple with our era’s quieter, less bombastic sense of existential angst. Her focus on some type of a better outcome through entropic decay points to her faith in human resilience, continually reshaped by necessity.
 
Nature is Loper’s constant foil for the unfulfilled promises of much earlier decades. In her paintings, the natural world always seems poised to fill in the voids left by man’s hubris. Animals inhabit vacant structures. Nature always appears verdant and nurturing. She depicts a brilliant stillness, a brittle and arrested moment. This stillness is the stage on which we humans will reenact our dramas once more.
 
Loper’s sensitivity opens us to pathos for this age. Her paintings allow us to feel both disappointment wrought by the failings of modernism and the glimmer of hope for the rebuilding of some of these ideals. She hints that the power to reshape or rebuild lies within our immediate grasp by tapping into our willingness to examine the legacy of the past without flinching and moving forward if we want to avoid repeating the same missteps. Her worlds are always collapsible, but she also constructed them in a way that can be maintained. Such mindfulness may be the most valuable tool for repairing the shattered world.